Spring 2017

Resources Update

Spring 2017 - Resources

Webinar for Healthcare Professionals: New guidelines for introducing peanut to babies: what do they mean?

Description: Free webinar on Thursday, June 8th by Dr. Edmond S. Chan (Canadian pediatric allergist).

Target Audience: Healthcare professionals

Organization: Food Allergy Canada and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (CSACI).

Website Link

Lupine Warning Issued to Peanut-Allergic Consumers

Description: Peanut-allergic individuals are at increased risk for lupin allergy, because lupin is a in the same plant family as peanut. Lupin is becoming more common in our food supply (usually ground into a flour). Recently, two pancake mixes were recalled, because of a reported allergic reaction in a peanut-allergic child. Peanut-allergic clients should be encouraged to speak with their allergist about their tolerance of lupin.

Organization: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Website Link

Research Update

Spring 2017- Research

Impact of school peanut-free policies on epinephrine administration.

Scope: The impact of different peanut policies on the rates of epinephrine administration in Massachusetts public schools was compared. Provides evidence regarding the most effective policies.

Who may be interested in reading full article? Dietitians (and other health care professionals) that work with school policies or families of school-aged allergic children.

Pub Med ID – 28347736

Guidance on completing a written allergy and anaphylaxis emergency plan.

Scope: Published by the American Academy of Pediatrics. A sample plan and detailed instructions are provided.

Who may be interested in reading full article? Dietitians (and other health care professionals) that work with school policies or families of school-aged allergic children.

Pub Med ID – 28193793

Infant formulas containing hydrolysed protein for prevention of allergic disease and food allergy

Scope: Cochrane review regarding the effect of hydrolyzed formula (extensive and partial) on infant allergy and cow’s milk allergy.

Who may be interested in reading full article? Dietitians advising clients on the use of infant formulas.

Pub Med ID – 28293923

Polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in infancy for the prevention of allergy

Scope: Cochrane review.

Who may be interested in reading full article? Pediatric and public health dietitians.

Pub Med ID – 27788565

Dietary therapy and nutrition management of eosinophilic esophagitis: a work group report of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Scope: An exceptional article written by leading dietitian experts in this area. A brief summary of the science and many client tools are provided.

Who may be interested in reading full article? Dietitians working with this patient population.

Pub Med ID – 28283156

Addendum guidelines for the prevention of peanut allergy in the United States

Scope: The Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergy in the United States (2010) are important guidelines. The recommendations regarding prevention of peanut allergy have been updated based on the latest research. They are specific and practical.

Who may be interested in reading full article? Pediatric and public health dietitians.

Pub Med ID – 28151739

Food allergy and the gut

Scope: Detailed review of different types of immune-mediated adverse reaction that result in digestive dysfunction. A few sections discuss detailed immunology, but the large majority of the article is understandable without this background.

Who may be interested in reading full article? Dietitians that help client with digestive dysfunction.

Pub Med ID – 27999436

Your Clinical Questions

Spring 2017 - Q&A

When I see clients with long detailed food sensitivity histories, I’m not sure where to start.

Clarifying their goals is a great place to start. What are they hoping to achieve from the consultation? Additionally, validating their experience with a statement like – “It must be difficult to have troubling symptoms that no one has an answer for.” – can be helpful. You don’t have to validate their sensitivities, just their experience. This can be extremely powerful, because their concerns are often dismissed by most health care professionals.